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Each year thousands of keratoconus patients are advised by their doctors to undergo corneal transplant surgery.

Keratoplasty or corneal transplant surgery

Each year thousands of keratoconus patients are advised by their doctors to undergo corneal transplant surgery. In reality, the overwhelming majority of this patient population with keratoconus would be able to see clearly and comfortably with a well designed and fit scleral lens.

Keratoplasty (corneal transplant surgery) is not a “walk in the park”. Keratoconus patients face significant risks and challenges with this surgery including intra ocular infection and rejection of the donor cornea. What must be appreciated is the fact that the medications that post corneal transplant patients use to prevent rejection can cause cataracts and glaucoma ( a sight threatening condition caused by elevated intra ocular pressure). Virtually every eye with keratoconus that undergoes a corneal transplant will need to be fitted with some type of contact or scleral lens after the eye stabilizes.

A well designed and fit scleral lens is very comfortable for keratoconus patients to wear and easy to handle. These unique lenses vault over the keratoconic cornea and are supported by the white portion of the eye known as the sclera. The space between the back surface of the scleral lens and the front surface of the cornea is filled with unpreserved saline solution. In other words, the front surface of the eye is always in a moist environment. Vision is almost always excellent.

The enclosed photos are just a few of the eyes with that we fit with scleral lenses. All of these patients were told that corneal transplant surgery was needed if clear, comfortable vision was to be obtained.

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Keratoplasty or corneal transplant surgery
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Keratoplasty or corneal transplant surgery
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Keratoplasty (corneal transplant surgery) is not a “walk in the park”. Keratoconus patients face significant risks and challenges with this surgery including intra ocular infection and rejection of the donor cornea.
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eyefreedom.com
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